Home

 

Spice Descriptions and Uses

Garlic - allium sativum

____________________________________________________

Ahhhh garlic! The noble friend to so many foods! You can use fresh garlic if it dries up to quickly for you just peel it and put it into a zip lock and put it in the freezer, or it comes in powdered form, chopped, minced, granulated or blended with salt. Powdered garlic is handy for many recipes and saves some peeling and chopping time.

Flavour:

Intense taste of onion with a mild sour aftertaste.

How to Use:

Tomato dishes, soups, dips, sauces, butters, gravies, salads, salad dressing, dill pickles, meats, poultry, fish, cheese dishes, stews, marinades, garlic bread and vegetables.

 

Measuring:

Garlic powder:

Beef, pork, lamb:

Tomato: sauceSoup:

-

1/8 teaspoon per pound of meat

1/8 teaspoon per 3 cups

1/2 teaspoon per 8 cups

Equivalents:

1/8 teaspoon garlic powder, instant minced garlic or granulated garlic is equivalent to 1 average sized fresh garlic clove

1/2 teaspoon garlic salt is equivalent to 1 average size fresh garlic clove

Other Info:

Garlic has a rich history of use. It has been maligned, used as a curative, chewed for strength in battle, heralded as a protection against misfortune, incorporated into exotic ice cream and is said to protect against werewolves. It's pretty good in the kitchen too.

This remarkable and odoriferous condiment not only wards off vampires, it also appears to protect against elevated levels of serum cholesterol, high blood pressure, and perhaps even cancer. And substances found in garlic have even been found to have antibiotic properties.

At the UCLA School of Medicine, researchers added aged garlic extract to test tubes containing cancer cells from humans and mice. A week later, they found that the growth of the cancerous cells had diminished, while healthy cells remained unaffected.

Similarly, at Pennsylvania State University, rats fed garlic were given a chemical known to turn normal breast cells cancerous. In some studies, there was a 70 percent reduction in the number of tumors. Scientists speculate that garlic interferes with the ability of cancer-causing chemicals to damage DNA, the part of the cell that carries hereditary information.

You don't have to risk alienating friends, family, and co-workers by dosing yourself with raw garlic. Aging garlic in vinegar or wine can drastically reduce the odor problem associated with garlic in the raw; and boiling or roasting it can make it sweet. (Sautéing garlic does not always eliminate the pungency; and frying it can give your whole house garlic breath.)


King's American Dispensatory.

by Harvey Wickes Felter, M.D., and John Uri Lloyd, Phr. M., Ph. D., 1898.

Allium (U. S. P.)—Garlic.

The bulb of the Allium sativum, Linné.
Nat. Ord.—Liliaceae.
COMMON NAME: Garlic.

Botanical Source.—The garlic plant has a stem about 2 feet high, leafy below the middle. It terminates in an umbelliferous head of pink, red or whitish flowers, intermixed with bulbs, enveloped in a calyptriform, horned spathe. They appear in July, and are rather longer than their stamens. The leaves are acute, distichous, glaucous, and channelled above. The medicinal part is the very proliferous, clustered bulbs, many of which are invested in the same silvery skin.

Description.—The bulb is compound, subspherical, covered with membranous scales. About 8 wedge-like, compressed bulblets, are arranged circularly around a central stem-base. The smaller bulbs are appressed laterally, and consist of succulent scales, enveloping a central, fleshy mass. Garlic has an acrid, warm taste, and a disagreeable, pungent, alliaceous odor.

History, Action, and Chemical Constituents.—Garlic is a native of Sicily, and is indigenous in Asia Minor and Central Asia, but is cultivated in gardens in various sections of the United States and Europe. The bulbs of this plant are official; when removed from the ground some of the stem is left attached, so that after desiccation, by exposure to the sun, or in a warm room, several stems may be secured together, thus forming small bundles for sale. The root loses about one-half its weight by drying, but scarcely any of its smell or taste. Garlic should be used without being previously dried. Though changing color, garlic may be preserved in a closed jar with a small amount of alcohol for some length of time, without impairment of its virtues. All parts of this plant, but more especially the bulbs, have a strong, offensive, very penetrating and diffusible smell, and an acrimonious, almost caustic taste; both of these properties are owing to an acrid, volatile oil, of a deep, brownish-yellow color (when crude), heavier than water, and possessing, in a strong degree, the odor and taste of the plant; sulphur is one of its constituents, the oil containing 6 per cent of a compound (C6H12S2) and 60 per cent of a substance (C6H10S2); the rest are higher sulphur compounds. Allyl sulphide does not occur in the oil (Semmler, 1892). When purified it is without color, not so heavy as water, and consists chiefly of a sulphur compound. Water dissolves a small amount of it, while in ether and alcohol it is readily soluble. In contact with the skin, it occasions violent pain, rubefaction, and frequently vesication. Garlic yields its properties to alcohol, vinegar, acetic acid, and boiling water by infusion.

Action, Medical Uses, and Dosage.—Garlic is stimulant, diuretic, expectorant, and rubefacient; it is used both for medical and culinary purposes. The medicinal effects above stated are owing to the absorption of its volatile oil, the stimulating action of which causes thirst, promotes the activity of the various excretory organs, as the skin, kidneys, and mucous membrane of the air-tubes, communicating its odor to their excretions. It has been beneficially used in coughs, catarrhal affections, pertussis, hoarseness, worms, and calculous diseases, during the absence of in animation. Externally, it has been employed as a resolvent in indolent tumors, and as a counter-irritant in cerebral and pulmonary affections. When applied along the spinal column and over the chest of infants, in the form of poultice, it is very useful in pneumonia; and placed over the region of the bladder, it has sometimes proved effectual in producing a discharge of urine when retention has arisen from torpor of the bladder. Garlic juice, oil of sweet almonds, and glycerin, of each equal parts, mixed, and dropped in the ear, has cured several cases of deafness, due probably to excessive cerumen, or to chronic debility of the mucous tissues of the organ of hearing. The dose of fresh garlic is 1 or 2 drachms; of the juice, a small teaspoonful. Large doses cause nausea, vomiting, purging and other unpleasant symptoms. The juice is often made into a syrup with sugar, by nurses, for coughs, catarrh, and pulmonary affections of infants. The odor imparted to the breath by garlic and onions, may be very much diminished by chewing roasted coffee grains, or parsley leaves and seeds.

 

Garlic Powder

Nutrient

Units

1 tsp

-------

2.80 g

Proximates

Water

g

0.181

Energy

kcal

9.296

Energy

kj

38.920

Protein

g

0.470

Total lipid (fat)

g

0.021

Carbohydrate, by difference

g

2.036

Fiber, total dietary

g

0.277

Ash

g

0.092

Minerals

Calcium, Ca

mg

2.240

Iron, Fe

mg

0.077

Magnesium, Mg

mg

1.624

Phosphorus, P

mg

11.676

Potassium, K

mg

30.828

Sodium, Na

mg

0.728

Zinc, Zn

mg

0.074

Copper, Cu

mg

0.004

Manganese, Mn

mg

0.015

Selenium, Se

mcg

1.064

Vitamins

Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid

mg

0.504

Thiamin

mg

0.013

Riboflavin

mg

0.004

Niacin

mg

0.019

Vitamin B-6

mg

0.076

Folate, total

mcg

0.056

Vitamin B-12

mcg

0.000

Vitamin A, IU

IU

0.000

Vitamin A, RE

mcg_RE

0.000

Vitamin E

mg_ATE

0.000

Lipids

Fatty acids, total saturated

g

0.004

4:0

g

0.000

6:0

g

0.000

8:0

g

0.000

10:0

g

0.000

12:0

g

0.000

14:0

g

0.000

16:0

g

0.004

18:0

g

0.000

Fatty acids, total monounsaturated

g

0.000

16:1 undifferentiated

g

0.000

18:1 undifferentiated

g

0.000

20:1

g

0.000

22:1 undifferentiated

g

0.000

Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated

g

0.011

18:2 undifferentiated

g

0.010

18:3 undifferentiated

g

0.001

18:4

g

0.000

20:4 undifferentiated

g

0.000

20:5 n-3

g

0.000

22:5 n-3

g

0.000

22:6 n-3

g

0.000

Cholesterol

mg

0.000

Phytosterols

mg

0.224

Amino acids

Tryptophan

g

0.006

Threonine

g

0.013

Isoleucine

g

0.018

Leucine

g

0.029

Lysine

g

0.016

Methionine

g

0.009

Cystine

g

0.005

Phenylalanine

g

0.014

Tyrosine

g

0.006

Valine

g

0.020

Arginine

g

0.047

Histidine

g

0.009

Alanine

g

0.010

Aspartic acid

g

0.036

Glutamic acid

g

0.060

Glycine

g

0.015

Proline

g

0.007

Serine

g

0.014